Maps

This section is awaiting permission for map extracts to use as examples to support the skills discussions. Contributions are welcome, but must come with proof of permission of the copyright holder.

O Maps at World of O

A vast collection of maps from around the world can be viewed at World of O maps site:

http://omaps.worldofo.com/

Now it is possible to view many maps with a course but without a route for armchair skills practice, then compare your route to the uploaded version. Most maps have a course on, but some are without.

World of O collects the maps from other websites where they are published such as Routegadget

Routegadget UK

https://www.routegadget.co.uk/

Routegadget UK holds maps from UK orienteering clubs races, with courses and competitor’s GPS traces. It is very helpful in post-race analysis.

Open Orienteering Map UK OOMUK map creation tool

When using these maps it extremely important to remember the following:

1 Orienteering depends on the good will of landowners.

2 Do not trespass. (And certainly do not enter land without permission, with any form of orienteering map in hand).

3 To use OOMUK maps for personal training keep to rights of way, streets and public parks and common land where you have a right of access.

4 Do not put out any control markers or any other items identifiable as being associated with orienteering. You always need permission for this.

5 Do not organize any form of race or competition without permission from the relevant landowners and where relevant the local authority. OOMUK maps are NOT suitable for orienteering in forest/ moorland. If you want to practice in these areas try a permanent course or check out the British Orienteering fixtures list for training and events near you. OOMUK maps are intended for streets and city parks with full public access. They do no have sufficient detail to be used safely in other terrain.

6 You use the map at your own risk and are not insured in anyway.

7 Groups (such as schools and scouts groups) who ignore these simple requirements can jeopardize access for orienteering not just for the area they run on, but for other areas within the same local authority or with the same landowners. Contact your local orienteering club (find them via British Orienteering) for school site maps and help with schools competitions. Orienteering clubs are engaged in a lot of outreach activities.

OOMUK is at: http://oomap.co.uk/gb/#/new/streeto/8/-0.9000/51.8000/

You can of course contribute improvements to the OSM database. That process is not covered here.

Street O symbols
“Pseudo O” symbols